Skip to content


FINGERPRINTS PART 2

Last month we talked about personal fingerprints of individual error patterns and how we hide our own mistakes deep inside in some pretty sacred places we rarely visit. It’s even more rare that we open up and share this with anyone else. But in order to understand our own error patterns, we have to acknowledge our tendencies, and that is the first step to develop safer attitudes and behaviors. 

For the full article see the AOPA website at:
https://pilot-protection-services.aopa.org/news/2019/december/01/fingerprints-part-2?_ga=2.53308779.230215008.1575309302-649318552.1568313326

Share on Facebook

Posted in Patient Safety.

Tagged with , , .


FINGERPRINTS – PART ONE

Way back in 1686, Marcello Malpighi, an Italian anatomy professor and also apparently quite a neat freak, seems to be the first guy who complained about the curious ridges, spirals and loop marks left by his students’ greasy hands on his nice clean desk. It wasn’t for another century, in 1788, that a German anatomist Johann Mayer figured out how fingerprint impressions were formed by the skin ridges at the end of our digits and still another 100 years, in 1880, that Henry Faulds published his studies that fingerprints are unique and everybody has a different pattern.  Although it’s taken 200 years to figure out that we all have different fingerprints, modern psychologists have taken only a few years to recognize another unique fingerprint that we all have, our own unique and personal fingerprints of errors.

For the full article see the AOPA website at: 

https://pilot-protection-services.aopa.org/news/2019/november/01/fingerprints—part-one?_ga=2.14511860.230215008.1575309302-649318552.1568313326

Share on Facebook

Posted in Patient Safety.

Tagged with , .